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't use violence against his people. does it show how little leverage the u.s. has in yemen now? >> reporter: we are seeing more and more the past few weeks, it looks as though the u.s. has more leverage. we saw a comment from the president in the last few weeks saying the u.s. shouldn't meddle. foreigners shouldn't intervene in the affairs there. there was a call between john brennan, the assistant to the president for homeland security. he was there telling yemen president they were praising him for his initiative and make sure they protect the protesters there. they agreed to that. today, you are seeing a crackdown, again. this is worrying to the u.s. there should be dialogue in yemen. the president is saying there should be. but we are seeing more and more violence in the streets. >> joining us live from abu dabi. that you know for that. >>> a critical and dangerous situation is going on right now with two nuclear plants damaged by the massive quake in japan. to make a bad situation worse, an explosion at one of them today. we have the latest coming up. [ male announcer ] 95
international airport. the shooting involved a u.s. military shuttle bus. someone got on the bus and started shooting. two are confirmed dead. we believe they're two u.s. soldiers. one person has been taken into custody. again we know two are killed. it is reported that those are two u.s. soldiers. the incident is over, the airport is operating as usual. this is out of frankfurt. as soon as we get more detail, we get to fred out of berlin. >>> the u.s. supreme court is reaffirming the first amendment right to free speech even if it is painful and ugly. in an 8-1 decision, they say a kansas church can push their message outside military funle rals. jeffrey toobin is on the phone with us. jeff, let's start off here, is this a surprise to you the court's decision? because this is a case that everybody's been watching. >> reporter: it's a pain until awful case and the westboro baptist church is an insuggelt religion everywhere. but the decision is not a surprise. these statements in this context, nondisruptive statements about politics, are at the heart of what the first amendment is all about e
. a major earthquake strikes japan... killing hundreds.. and triigering tsunami pacific and u-s. we have just learned that tsunami waves are hitting hawaii... being evacuated.some counties in washington state and oregon are also being evacuated. evacuated.here's a look at what started it all... the 8-point-9 magnitude qqake sent people fleeing into streets... and fell into waters unnerneaah.up to three-hundred bodies have been found in japan.. and hundreds of others areestill missing.the entire west coast of the u-s is under a tsunami warning. will they or won't they?that's the question when it comes to the looming n-f-l lockout.. after a week extension..the deadline is today.the n-f-l players union and team owners are at crossroads when it comes to money.if no progress is made, look for the owners to lock out the players. we are now just one day away from our be-more healthy expo. all day tomorrow ... you can come out to the convention center downtown to take a step towards a new more active lifes. lifestyle. candace dold is live in our studio with a preview. ad lib. 33 coming up..
there is no sign dangerous radiation is coming here. >>> good evening. as we come on the air tonight, the u.s. navy is now racing to the rescue in japan. where there is word that electricity is about to return to the fukushima nuclear plant, and the u.s. is flying in five giant pumps from a navy base in nagasaki. they are pumps that can deliver enormous amounts of water, after we all watched today as the helicopters tried to spray water, but to no avail. our reporters are out in force on the story tonight. and we will go to japan in a moment. but first, let's head to martha raddatz who has been talking all day to the u.s. officials who are now helping the japanese. martha? >> reporter: diane, every day, the nuclear monster seems to get more frightening. but there is some hope tonight from that big u.s. push to send in water pumps. this coming after last ditch efforts by the japanese failed. one expert told us it's like using a squirt gun to put out a forest fire. japanese fire trucks using riot control water hoses to tackle red hot nuclear reactors. helicopters swooping overhead, dropping bucket af
and balanced. >> bret: a massive earthquake strikes japan. how is the u.s. responding? now there are concerns about nuclear power plants there. president obama says the noose is tightening around muammar gaddafi but events may suggest otherwise. saudi day of rage, did it materialize? live from the studio in washington. this is "special report." good evening. i'm bret baier. the u.s. and the rest of the world are mobilizing tonight to assist japan, following a massive earthquake and tsunami early this morning. the magnitude 8.9 offshore quake unleashed a 23-foot tsunami. hundreds are believed dead and that number could rise. japan says the power inside the nuclear plant is 1,000 times than the normal level. they lost control over pressure in reactors. waves hit hawaii and the u.s. west coast causing major damage to boats in one california harbor and one person is reported missing. japan's eastern coast saw massive devastation in an instant the office buildings became danger zones. >> i thought i was going to die. >> bret: the magnitude 8.9 offshore quake shook cities and villages up and down j
and the u.s. nuclear chief says the water evaporated. if they are exposed they can catch fire, melt, and release large amounts of ridation into the air. we are told crews are still working on a new power line that would restore the electricity there in theory and get the water pumps back up and running. officials say the cold snap is slowing down their effort but not word on when that cable might be connected. in the meantime, 200 courageous plant workers, 180 of them, are jack belling to cool the reactors by hand. they are risking their lives to prevent a catastrophe. a total meltdown is a stunning blow after the earthquake and tsunami that devastated the northeast portion of japan. we got dramatic new video to fox of people trying to save eve other as the monster wave swept through the town. look at this. (speaking japanese). >>shepard: a week later search teams are still digging for the dead. and survivors gather what is last of their belongings. but for many, there is simply nowhere to go. expire towns are wiped off the map and it will take likely years to rebuild. so we will ge
-made guns across the border and for the unrelenting demand of illegal drugs in the u.s. the two countries are also at odds after a wikileaks release quoting u.s. officials quoting mexican's security agencies "corrupt and dysfunctional." publicly, the obama administration is putting a positive spin on the relationship. >> there exists an unprecedented level of cooperation between the u.s. and mexico. >> but when the two presidents go behind bars, tensions could rise over a recent interview in which president calderon called u.s. law enforcement agencies disorganized. and there will also be discussions about the growing number of americans caught in the cross fire of mexico's drug war, including u.s. immigration agent, jaime spatta, who was killed in an ambush along a highway 16 days ago. at his funeral last week, homeland department secretary, janet napolitano, promised to seek justice. >> we will not relent or let up or flinch in any way in our determination to see that those responsible for his death are held to account for their crimes. >> mexico is the u.s.'s largest trade partner, and
, this time at reactor number 4. martha: the u.s. officials say the next 28-48 hours are critical in stopping and cooling down what's going on inside these reactors. if it doesn't happen, this area could be deadly for many years to come. good morning julian. tell me what the latest is from where you are. >> reporter: i think have much the efforts today to put cold water on the reactors has failed. the helicopters have only marginally put as much water as they wanted to on the reactors. it doesn't seem to be having a regular effect. all hopes rest with the crews trying to link up the electricity line back into the plant that will then allow them to restart the generators which automatically pump cold water onto these heated up reactors and bring temperatures down. all other efforts seem to have failed. the attempt to use fire engines to pump cold water on the reactors has failed. they are look at a single solution now. martha: it sounds like it's up to these people known as the fukushima 50, 180 workers rotating in and out of the plant to limit their own exposure to the radiation. what a coura
coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't reach the plant. however, having said that, the levels of radiation in tokyo have returned to normal. apparently the italian embassy found that levels of radiation were a fifth of what they were in r
's talk about that also with retired u.s. army general george jalwan, the nato allied supreme commander. if in fact this is true that the president in recent days, maybe the past week or two, signed a covert action order, a finding, as they call it, to secretly assist the rebels who are fighting gadhafi's forces, what does that say to you? >> first of all, i have no knowledge of whether he signed a finding or not. it may be one of two things, may be an actual sort of action or it could be keep pressure on gadhafi to really feel the heat that he's feeling now with the resignation of his foreign minister and also with what i think is what is happening in london where the international community is very much united in what needs to be done. >> for all practical purposes the coalition, now nato control, they -- they have taken aside in this civil war, they want to help the rebels and see gadhafi go, even though the u.n. security council resolution didn't go that far as we all know. here's the question. if in fact the president signed a secret finding that goes way beyond what the coalition
. and so modelers, the u.s. government, can see every level of the atmosphere. and if a piece of radiation, a big piece of radiation, a meltdown occurs, they will be able to run the models and figure out where that ra radiation's going to go. >> if there's a meltdown, as we know from chernobyl, this can kae. we have been talking about the amount of radiation that is likely released. it is not likely to have had some major effect across ocean. >> slight breaking news we haven't had on air yet. fukushima daiichi is what we have been talking about. >> right. >> shawn, zoom in. there's another plant ten miles south of there and they have issued a ten kilometer radius evacuation to that plan. this has literally happened in the past few hours. >> what is that? a fire? >> we literally doesn't know. >> some emergency. >> enough of an emergency that the people that are living around this plant are being forced to move. there's already a 30 kilometer around daiichi. >> must be unsettling to not know. he made the point, there are people who don't think the government's lying to them, they just don't
, and the u.s. are scrambling to enforce a no-fly zone over libya now that the u.n. security council has authorized all necessary measures. cnn international correspondent nic robertson is live in tripoli. good morning, nic. >> reporter: good morning, christine. well, we've already heard from the deputy foreign minister here who says he doesn't expect immediate air strikes here, but wouldn't say what preparations the army or anyone else in the country may be taking to defend the country with this new u.n. resolution. when he was asked about the cease-fire that the resolution calls for, he seemed to indicate that the government here was going to take some time to do that. they didn't have anyone to negotiate with that they would put it in place. but this was something that was going to take time. seemed to hint that the army here may plan to continue with some of its offensive. that offensive was going on in the east, and we have no updated information from that front line this morning, christine. >> does this u.n. resolution paint -- does it paint them into a corner, gadhafi and his alli
, tsunami warnings for at least 20 countries. and hawaii and the west coast of the u.s. under warnings as well. let me tell you about this quake. a devastating one, one of the most powerful earthquakes ever recorded. it was an 8.9 magnitude quake. it hit off the coast of japan overnight. there have been several powerful aftershocks being felt, up to 7.0 in magnitude. the quake was centered 300 miles from tokyo, but it was felt in tokyo. buildings swayed. take a look at these pictures. our bureau there in tokyo as well. some of our co-workers being thrown around at times as well. this is just one of the views inside. people poured out onto the streets afterwards. they say it's a city in chaos right now. the danger we have now, the concern, a tsunami. it did trigger a tsunami, massive waves, some as high as 30 feet, starting to come ashore in places. this wall of water is starting to bring with it -- it's washing away cars, boats, buildings. looks like lava almost making its way through. here's the most stunning picture. waves of mud and debris can be seen like lava flowing through some
room." >>> now, breaking news. urgent new teams to cool down an overheated reactor. now the u.s. government is stepping in to evacuate possibly thousands of americans from the country and get them away from any nuclear danger. secretary of state hillary clinton tells our wolf blitzer she's worried about the health and saved of americans in japan even as she heads home from tunis tunisia. i'm candy crowley, you're in "the situation room." nuclear experts say the new attempt to douse an overheated reactor has been somewhat effective. helicopters, fire trucks and police water cannons all have been deployed. we are told that radiation levels dipped, but they are still high, so the frarchtic work to prevent a full-scale meltdown goes on. cnn's anna coren is nil tokyo. just bring us up to date. >> well, candidate, it's entering the seventh day of this crisis, and now at the fukushima daiichi plant trying to bring this situation under control. we saw the pictures of the helicopters, trying to spray water onto the reactors. those crews had to get out because of the radiation levels incr
: at this point, 7 ships are headed to japan including the u.s.s. ronald reagan that has medical facilities as well as air lift capabilities to move people and supplies. the u.s. has 38,000 troops who were already stationed in japan. the defense department put out a video of marines ready to head to mainland japan with other assets. secretary gates says the military wants to do whatever is needed by the government of japan or by the government in tokyo. >> we have the ronald reagan closing in japan. we are sending another ship, we're pulling in helicopters from around the region, from okinawa and so on. so those ships can be used for helicopter operations in humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. >> molly: as far as american citizens in japan, so far the u.s. government has no reports of serious injuries or deaths. >> jamie: molly, the government is downplaying somewhat the risk of the radiation but search and rescue seems viable at this point. what teams other than we spoke will be going there. >> molly: they are serious experts. usig says two teams have been deployed to japan at the
of condolences today in washington calling for a safety review of all u.s. nuclear plants and offered assurances that harmful levels would not reach the west coast. >> now, state health officials are trying to reassure us tonight that the west coast does not face a serious threat from japan. this one is in san francisco. and uc berkeley scientists put up one on top of the engineering building. california's director of public health says reports are not true. >> there are winds shift sog some will be blowing west. almost all will get washed out by storms that are there and dissipate. >> dr. backer says there may be a slight increase in radiation over next few day buzz amount will be no greater than what we're exposed to on a daily basis. >> many people continue to have concerns about dangerous radiation reaching our shores. rain freedman has been following this story and not everyone believes what they hear from the government. >> that is true. it's more of mistrust. and there are a lot of people still buying radiation dedoctors on ebay, and are buying pills in stores. and there are people saying
libya. what it could mean for u.s. military. computer hackers targeting celeb's private e-mail files and compromising pictures. now a federal investigation is under way. >>> let's start with moammar gadhafi changing course in response to the u.n. security council vote to impose a no-fly zone over libya and use all necessary measures to protect civilians. a no-fly zone could bring the u.s. military into libya with air strikes. some people are questioning, does this mean a third military engagement for an already-pressed u.s. military? gadhafi has imposed a cease-fire halting all military operations. this is a complete 180 for the leader who promised fierce attacks if libya was bombed. "the new york times" says four of its journalists who were reported missing in libya have been found. "the times" said all four were captured by forces loyal to gadhafi and will be released. we'll keep you posted on developments in this story. >>> that frantic battle to contain a nuclear situation growing more serious by the moment. japan is asking the u.s. for help and a very, very small part
for about 20 countries and includes the west coast of the u.s., hawaii, as well, alaska, as well. >> yeah, i understand, rob, we've been hearing there's a full coastal evacuation in effect in hawaii right now. and we get this sheet and i know you have it too of the coordinates and the estimated arrival time. what does that translate into in terms of waves and what people can expect? and really how much time they have to get out of harm's way? >> well, the pictures that we've been showing, those dramatic pictures where you see water and debris on all sorts of stuff moving rapidly inland, being pushed in like that and tens of miles inland, there was little warning. this is very close to the shoreline, and the epicenter was about 80 miles offshore. so the wave -- the tsunami after the quake happened hit that shoreline about 15 to 20 minutes later. virtually no warning at all. and you get the full force of that impact without any sort of buffer from the ocean. now, as this thing travels across the ocean in all directions down to the south up to the north off to the east, it does begin to lose it
. >> reporter: worry about the stability of countries in the middle east, now worry about u.s. economic recovery is urging the obama administration toward tapping the strategic reserve. >> it is one we are considering, it has been done in very rare occasions there is a bunch of factors that have to be looked at and it is just not the price. >> reporter: america's strategic petroleum research every holds 777 million-barrels of oil. selling oil from the reserve at $100 a barrel could ease the federal deficit but new york times report online says obama administration is concerned about taking oil from the reserve when there is excess oil production capacity around the world. when the reserve was tapped in 2005 after hurricane katrina. oil prices dropped 9% now? >> i think it is time and we need to look at other sources of energy. >> reporter: now is not the time some say. >> not the strategic reserve i am buying an electric car tomorrow and it will give me the patriotic pleasure of not sending money overseas to someone trying to blow us up. >>> tapping the reserve would free up supply but only have
in the opening minutes of the day as the u.s. stock market reacts to the nuclear crisis. >>> i'm tamron hall. the "news nation" is following the latest on the nuclear emergency in japan where it is 3:00 a.m. local time. threat level is now being called a six out of seven by the french authority of nuclear safety. a watchdog group that monitors radiation safety. chernobyl, for some perspective here, was six out of serve. three mile island was rated a five. latest explosion in unit two of the fukushima plant may be the worst yet. international atomic energy agency says there's evidence it breached the primary containment shell. that means more radiation could be leaking from that unit. the iaea says radiation levels at site have been decreasing. people living within 20 kilometers of the plant have been evacuated and are lining up to be scanned for radiation. a no-fly zone has been established around the crippled nuclear plant for 30 kilometers. global economic fears, the stock market plummeted today because of the nuclear concerns and right now the dow, let's take a look at it, is down 178 poi
, and the west coast. it appears the u.s. has escaped significant damage. we'll check in with meteorologist jeff ranieri in san francisco in a moment. first, joining me on the phone from tokyo is our producer, arata yamamoto. hello, arata. >> reporter: hi. >> there have been more than 100 aftershocks of a magnitude of five or greater, i believe. are you feeling these? >> reporter: some of them. not all. i am 188 miles south of the epicenter. ones i feel here are not as many as that. >> and are you seeing any further signs of damage where you are? >> reporter: not here in tokyo. i think the damage that was caused in tokyo, we heard reports of a walkway collapsing and we have reports of death here but that was from the first earthquake, not from the following aftershock. >> i believe the road system, as well, has been damaged in tokyoingtokyo i , a number of high ways closed, correct? >> reporter: the roads are closed. and what's compounded that is the fact that up until around midnight most of the train system was shut down which meant that everyone, people working in tokyo on a friday, busy frid
. the warnings have been issued for at least 20 countries including the u.s. west coast. >>> good morning i am sherrie johnson. we have team coverage and live reports from around the u.s. and the world this morning. we kick things off with abc's emily schmidt live in washington with how white house officials are responding. >> reporter: the earthquake lasted second but the catastrophe continues to spread. there are tsunami warnings stretching across the a sick and waves are hitting hawaii right now. largest quake in japan's history shook a nation. and triggered tsunami waves that threatened the u.s. west coast. forcing evacuations in hawaii. >> it's time for a little aloha and a little you keep it simple and sensible and moving. >> reporter: cameras capture the moment the earthquake hit in japan. for lawmakers gathered for government, the newsroom shaken up by the 8.9 magnitude earthquake. the quake set off huge fires including this oil refinery north of tokyo. workers evacuated high rises and filled the streets. millions are without power after the deadly quake. one woman said i thought i was
into their cause. that is half of their active force. the united states involved in a big way, as well. the u.s.a. ronald -- u.s.s. ronald reagan and 20 rescue missions were run and choppers from there. six were in operation, rescue operations. you name it. at the end, it all comes to down to the japanese people. again in small coastal town we watched you might see a boat behind me. there were boats, there were trucks, there were cars lining the streets upside-down swept by the tsunami which had hit here on friday. most of those were taken away by the end of the day, very determined people, indeed. >> gregg: earthquake in japan hitting very close to home. many japanese-americans trying to get in touch with their loved ones. one community on the west coast springing into action to help victims. casey stegall is live in little tokyo section of los angeles. >> reporter: a lot of people don't know this but 300,000 japanese-americans call the state of california home. that is the largest population in all of the united states. little tokyo, a neighborhood back here behind me in downtown los angeles,
have traces of fukushima radiation shown up in milk in two u.s. states? >>> and take that! the young girl who got back at her bullies by shaming them for all the world to see. >>> we begin with a series of new developments of libya. as of today the u.s. has officially handed off control of the mission to nato. the cia is on the ground and has been for several weeks. the debate rages on over whether or not the u.s. should arm the rebels. listen to what robert gates told a congressional hearing about this this morning. >> in terms of providing that training, in terms of providing assistance to them, frankly, there are many countries that can do that, that's not a unique capability for the united states and as far as i'm concerned, somebody else should do that. >> rebel forces fighting concern have been forced to retreat over 100 miles and lost control of critical areas. the libyan foreign minister, the most powerful man outside the gadhafi family, who is now in the uk. nbc news chief foreign correspondent richard engel live in benghazi. it's been a busy 24 hours, richard. >> reporter:
is in recess. we are going to focus on the story from libya. and your calls and reaction as u.s. and allies strike those targets. 202-737-0002, our line for democrats. 202-737-0001 for republicans. for independence, the number to call is 202-628-0205. here are some of the headlines from domestic newspapers beginning with "new york post." "take that gaddafi." "strike one." an air assault, no ground troops, but tomahawk missiles continue to strike those targets. some other headlines beginning with the chicago tribune. u.s. allies are attacking libya. most of it right along the coast. you can see along the mediterranean sea. l.a. times -- attacks on libya. you can see from the u.s. and navy destroyers. operation "odyssey dawn" was the name of the operation. from the "richmond times- dispatch", the u.s. striking libyan forces. and from the "miami herald", libya under fire. you can join the conversation online at twitter.com/cspanwj. caller: good morning. i would like to know what the heck is going on. here we are and another freakin' war. congress is on vacation. who is minding the store? i'm a
at that plant are considering asking the u.s. military and japanese military to use hel helicopters to spray water into the reactors. that seems a dangerous measure but as you can see this crisis is escalating jon. greg: what is being done as far as the relief efforts? >> reporter: well, there's a massive relief effort going on come nateed by the nuclear issue. we know there are a hundred thousand japanese troops involved and the u.s. military are also heavily involved in it. the carrier the reagan is off-shore with a fleet of three ships and there's many more coming particularly from okinawa the marine base. they are gearing up to help at this time. it's very difficult. the other problem we are facing now is temperatures are dropping heavily at night and that is really hindering any attempt to save these people, basically four days after the earthquake and tsunami, jon. greg: with no power or heat in a lot of peep that's got to be a terrible tribulation for the people trying to survive. david piper reporting live. jenna: david mentioned some of our response. the u.s. military moving warship
and the possibility of the u.s. nations conducted air strikes against libyan forces which are just out side of that gauzy right now. let us go to the newsroom. >> reporter: good point, there are four journalists that will be released today. the for a journalist before reported missing while they were covering the libyan conflict. there will be released later on this afternoon. i will keep monitoring the wires into be posted throughout the morning. back to. >> thank-you, the time ballot is 602. that is talk about the weather. james? >>james: it does point to be wet, what, what all day. we of rain in san mateo. bring to the north. --rain to the north. it is a substantial bit of grain. a days trekking to the northeast as we said then up to the east we are going to see near the 1 01 at purging whitakeapproaching woodacre. expect, and the next hour or two to see raid.n. just going off shore and trek across the bay is good to be targeted towards a word. expect it to a arrived in just a little bit. this is what we're saying for storm trucker for. --seeing for storm tracker 4. the timing is at 9:00
to one u.s. official, the new focus is on reactors three and four, where old spent fuel rods are in danger of over heating and releasing plumes of radioactive activity. >> it is dangerous than the meltdown, because there's more radiation in an unguarded fuel pond. >> old fuel, it actually is more dangerous than the meltdown. its radiation in an unguarded spent fuel pond, but a full scale meltdown remains a possibility. at reactor three, the 5-foot container of concrete and steel around the vessel is damaged. all u.s. citizens in japan should continue to carefully monitor the situation and follow the guidance of the u.s. and japanese governments. >> according to the official, this morning's mission to cool the reactors with military helicopters, dumping buckets of water has failed. the japanese plan is to restart with a power line. american officials fear they may not work. which is why the u.s. is sending its own high pressured pumps in. 180 workers, all at great risk to their lives are being rotated in and out of the danger zone. outside, thousands are being evacuated. >>
almost $2 billion in appropriations and putting the u.s. taxpayer on the hook for another $40 billion in potential liabilities. mr. secretary, this committee never consented to these increases, authorization bills are needed for each bank spelling out specific forms and possibility withholding funds until forms are met. i can't support writing blank checks to the institutions. capital increases will be extremely difficult to justify without convincing evidence that the taxpayer dollars will be used in a more effective and transparent manner than they have been used in the past. mr. secretary, i predict the subcommittee will face difficult choices. we'll have to look at each request to determine what is critical to our national security. we must prioritize spending by looking at what works, what is good oversight, and what is not duplicated elsewhere. i urge you to approach the subcommittee with your request in that context today and as the year progresses. finally, i want to mention the unique role the treasury department plays in u.s. foreign policy. your work to administer sanctions
. the u.s. military is sending a nine-member team to japan, as early as today, to help evacuate -- to evaluate the nuclear situation. it's not clear if they will go to the plant that's been damaged. president obama is due to make a statement at 3:30 eastern time. joining me now is a physicist who has worked on nuclear reactor accident simulations. thank you for joining us. >> nice to be here. >> let's talk about this breaking news at this power cable may be down very soon and this could finally provide some power to unit number three. one of those -- unit number two, excuse me. one of those units affected in this crisis. >> i think that's an extremely good news. if a.c. power had been restored within, you know, a day, we wouldn't have had any of the problems we're dealing with right now. it's too bad it's taken six days, going on seven, to get power there. but restoration of a.c. power will make a huge difference, especially at the three nuclear reactors. >> one of your concerns is that we're seeing trouble with three reactors and them having the problem at the same time there.
earthquakes the world has ever seen. 8.9 quake hting japan overnight. the waves now barreling towards the u.s. pictures we are seeing out of japan are unimaginable. it's wave after wave literally swallowing up cars, boats and homes. some terrifying moments in an airport outside of tokyo when the quake hit. watch this video. now there is one report. you find the capital city of tokyo. that report that confirmed. but an earthquake of horrific proportions causing buildings to shake and the tsunami that followed. seldom have we seen images like this. welcome to "america's newsroom." martha: this quake struck just after 3:00 p.m. local time in japan while most of us were sleeping. this was the scene. unbelievably powerful waves crashing ashore causing wired spread destruction. there are massive fires being dealt with and a nuclear emergency. we have more details on that. bill: there was so much to watch and do have, we'll do our best it, the 7th largest earthquake ever record. it's the largest to hit japan. evacuations underway in several coastal towns. trace gallagher joins us with more on that.
consider asking for outside help but would the u.s. answer the call? as american warships head to the region just what is the u.s. military willing to offer? >>> oil futures rise above $100 a barrel a day after the dow slumped 1.5%. we'll check where the market is headed before the opening bell today. >>> and flip-flop already? or just a communications mix-up. we'll get to the bottom of newt announcing for president thursday debacle. chuck has the back story. good morning. wednesday, march 2nd, 2011. i'm savannah guthrie. >> i'm chuck todd. amazing what making sure you have two sources do and can keep you out of trouble. we'll get more into that. all of that plus does michael huckabee think president obama grew up in kenya and will the beloved "the daily rundown" moth pad get a tablet today. let's get to the rundown. moammar gadhafi is vowing to fight to the last man as he ramps up efforts to hold onto his country in the face of a growing rebellion. pierce battles in the east and west. the libyan air force is bombing rebel territory sending forces to an oil base in the eastern
government said that the japan asked for help from u.s. forces in japan. are you willing to provide those assistance? >> the answer to your second question is, yes. i told prime minister kan we'll provide whatever assistance they need. my understanding is the main assistance to provide them is lift capacity. the ability for us to i think help in the cleanup. obviously, when you have a tsunami like this, as well as an earthquake, you have huge disruptions both in the infrastructure. you have boats and houses and cars that are washed in to main thoroughfares and any assistance we can provide we will be providing. you know, i'm heartbroken by this tragedy. i think when you see what's happening in japan, you are reminded that for all of our differences and culture or language or religion, that ultimately, humanity is one. and when we face these kinds of natural disasters, whether it's in new zealand or haiti or japan, then you think about your own family. and you think how would you feel if you lost a loved one or if your entire life savings were gone because of the devastation. and the japan
of condolence, is set to address the nation on the crisis that takes a new turn by the hour. >>> today, the u.s. military began drafting plans to evacuate dependents from several bases in the region. the state department says it's now actively assisting other americans wishing to evacuate. among those heeding these warnings are many of our nbc colleagues. but what will they carry with them? at chicago's o'hare and dallas-ft. worth airports, radiation levels, thankfully low, have been picked up on passengers returning from japan. but the battle and the focus remain on the fukushima station and its crippled reactors. reactor number three, the scene of aerial water bombardment today, brave crew members dropped sea water in a desperate attempt to cool what is being describes as the single greatest threat. the fukushima six reactors, reactor three is the only one housing a mixed fuel known as mox, short for mixed oxide, a material made of reclaimed plutonium, the release of which would pose far more devastating effects than weave seen thus far. reactor four and its lack of water set off the biggest
're not experts in that realm. we're not going to speculate and go with what the japanese and u.s. officials tell us. anyway you look at it it's a very serious situation, i think right now people are concerned about the search and rescue efforts and concerned about the fact that they can't get to a lot of these areas due to the fact that they're in areas near or around where the nuclear reactors are having these problems. >> so many things to deal with. adam housley reporting live to us from mito, japan. stay well, we look forward to your reports. >> reporter: will do. >> jamie: we will he' check back with adam. the situation at the nuclear power plant is obviously of great concern because japan relies heavily on nuclear power. about 30% of all of its electricity is produced by 55 power units and the earthquake forcing 11 to be shut down and japan, also the world's third largest producer of nuclear power. let's bring in kt mcfarland of fox news national security analyst. kt, you've examined many sides of what occurred, this tragedy in japan. on this particular one, what is japan facing? >> well,
information here. this is tape up from not too long ago. the u.s. house of representatives has just voted to pass the bill to defund national public radio, npr. the final tally was 228 yeas, 192 nays. so the u.s. house officially has spoken. >>> not too far away from capitol hill it, live pictures at the white house. we're waiting here. any minute the president will be speaking in the rose garden. we're told this was announced just today. he'll be making some sort of brief comment and specifically about japan. we don't know yet fell offer up a little time on the back end to take questions from some of those white house corps reporters. dan lothian is standing by for me as is gloria borger. standing by, as well. dan, let's first set the scene here. i mean, we have just found out today that the president would be speaking. what will do you know about what he may say and also talk about what he's just done this afternoon with regard to the japanese embassy. >> that's right. that's the hint perhaps as to what the president will say when he made that visit unexpected, a stop the an the japanes
's forces are surrounding the rebels. how involved should the u.s. get? >> gregg: new details now on a major nuclear scare in japan. japanese officials say radioactivity levels very close to the nuclear plant have gone down in the last several hours. this plant facing a potentially disastrous meltdown after an explosion this morning. take a look at these incredible pictures, clouds of smoke rising from up the reactor area. safety officials are scrambling to contain the damage and evacuating 140,000 people in a 12-mile perimeter. adam housley is streaming live with the latest north of tokyo? >> we're about 20 miles from where we were earlier this morning, 70 miles north and to the eat of tokyo, halfway to where the reactors are. the location we are at southern end of where the tsunami came through here. pictures waf been seen the last few days, you can see some of the destruction. car next to me was carried down the street. there is a car over on the distance that was up on the top of fence. in this was a power structure and some sort of a banner that was hanging across the intersection. in t
'll get our first indication of the strength of the event on the u.s. mainland, over the next 15 minutes and that is when forecasts show the waves will reach san francisco. whether or not they'll be damaging, or even noticeable, has yet to be seen. >> japan's east coast, hit with a 23-foot tsunami, shortly after the quake struck. police along the country's northeast coast, report finding the bodies of two to three hundred people, japan railways working to find a missing passenger train. while the government reports the giant wave swept away a ship, carrying about 100 people. >> unfortunately we expect to get more reports like those, 8.9 magnitude quake is japan's worst on record as we say, one of the worst in world history. and rocked cities hundreds of miles from epicenter an spawned dozens and dozens, as we hear it of aftershocks. >> look at one of japan's three nuke we're power plants, that are having some problems right now, the worst in the city of onahana where police ordered evacuations where a fire disabled a cooling system there. no reports of radiation leaking, secretary of sta
, the u.s. supreme court in an 8 to 1 vote said that jury verdict has to be set aside that the first amendment protects the messages of this group. now, chief justice john roberts who wrote the opinion said that the protest was entirely legal. the group abided by the local restrictions of how far away to be from the church. they were not violent and the message while repugnant to many does get into questions of public concern about the military, about gay rights and about the catholic church. he said at the end of the opinion, speech is powerful. it can move people to action. it can move people to tears and it can even inflict great pain, but the government cannot react by punishing the speaker. there was one dissenter today, samuel alito who said this is not ultimately about public issue, but a private action and private attack on a single-family and single father and the father should be able to sue for damages. controversial decision, but clearly, we know where the supreme court feels because of the 8 to 1 vote, contessa. >> thank you, pete. breaking news out of germany, we know t
addressed the nation monday night to clarify the purpose of the u.s. mission in libya. >> i refuse to wait for the images of slaughter and mass graves before taking action. when our interests and values are at stake, we have a responsibility to act. that's what's happened in libya. >> reporter: the explanation comes more than a week after the u.s. military and a coalition of allies began military action to enforce the united nations backed no fly zone in the civil war torn country. president obama explained actions the united states has taken to protect the libyan people from the brutality of moammar gadhafi and u.s. policy going forward as nato takes control of the mission. >> we will deny the regime arms, cut off its supplies of cash, assist the opposition and work with other nations to hasten the day when gadhafi leaves power. >> reporter: both republicans and democrats have criticized the president's policy questioning the purpose, cost and possible consequences. the ranking republican on the senate armed services committee praised the president's remarks but said he didn't go far enou
, the u.s. state department is sending charter planes to help bring back american citizens who want to leave and advising americans to stay at least 50 miles from the power plant. here is the latest. >> reporter: with japanese fukushima daiichi plant crippled on the ground desperate efforts are coming from the air. helicopters dumping sea water into the holes of the roof of damaged reactor number three hoping to cool it enough to prevent a nuclear meltdown. the energy commerce says there is talk of apocalypse and i think the word is well chosen. it was considered too dangerous yesterday. they said radiation levels were too high. the. >> we are reminded how american leadership is critical to our closest allies, even if the allies are themselves economically advanced and powerful, there are moments where they need our help. >> the state department is providing aircraft to help americans leave japan and wants to evacuate americans 50 miles of the plant. the japanese zone is much smaller. tokyo's airport is packed with people leaving. like a 15-year-old sent by parents to stay with fami
and offered our japanese friends whatever assistance is needed. >> the u.s. has been present in japan since 1945 when general mcarthur oversaw the occupation following world war ii. today, our military has over 35,000 troops stationed there. 15 american ships make up the u.s. relief efforts headed to the area this past week including a nuclear powered warship the uss ronald reagan. >> it is a supercarrier with capabilities like air lift which would allow cargo and people to move on and off the shift and medical facilities that equate to a full hospital onboard. other ships on their are way are stopping to singapore to unload relief supplies to get them to japan. we also have some 35,000 troops there and they could be mobilized as well. >>> survivors picking through the debris of what is left and it is as bad as anything i have seen. >> but amid the debris, some stories of hope. while soldiers were searching for victims in a badly damaged town along the northeast coast of japan they heard sounds of life. they found a 4 month old baby girl covered in mud. she mile after mile of death and dest
of disasters? >> yeah, that 85% number came from a u.s. seismologist and you heard that same number from australian sieismologists as well who believe that something in the 7's will come our way and historically what happens in this region after the first massive quake. will it happen? that remains to be seen of course. and people don't have a lot of supplies. we are where we're located on the edge of the structures, along the waterfront and remind people what we saw in southeast asia, in 2004-2005, they had the tsunami warning system here in place and the people, the market pass packed at the time and 15 minutes to get away and a seven or eight foot wall of water. and i've been told by a couple of people in the region, if another tsunami were to come, they're working officially and the warning systems are either out and they were destroyed when the water came through or there's no electricity to run them. other parts of the country are having blackouts to help the people who don't have electricity maybe funnel some of that power to the north. and very cold here at night and several mill
's important that any no-fly zone over libya not be a u.s.-led effort. when pressed on whether the u.s. would support a no-fly zone, she said "we're going to support the efforts being made because we think that the people of libya have to be supported and we know how difficult as the struggle is." ed henry joins me from the white house. what is going on inside the administration? there was talk about doing something through nato. are they any closer to coming to a decision on a no-fly zone? >> reporter: they don't seem any closer at all. the president did a phone call with the british prime minister and afterwards white house officials said they agreed gadhafi must go, all options are on the table, including a no-fly zone. but we've heard that same formulation for days now, a couple weeks in fact. when jay carney was pressed by reporters after that, what are you going to do, are you going to go before the u.n. security council, he basically said i'm not going to get into the details of exactly what process we're going to use. so it's still anyone's guess, are they going to go through the u.n.
citizens to leave the capital. the austrian government is moving its embassy here to osaka. u.s. embassy officials nbc news has learned had a meeting earlier today with folks who work there, with their families to try to elay some of the concerns of americans living here in tokyo. it has been confirmed for us. we talked to people involved in the meeting that several people stood up and said, should i stay or should i go? that is the question a lot of people, especially people are asking here, and it's a very individual kind of answer. three separate families came out of the embassy in the hour that i was standing there. all of them said they were considering leaving. when i talked to james wright, who was there with his wife, his 3-year-old daughter, and 5-month-old twins, he was getting the twins' passports so that if they decided to leave, they could. how would he make that decision? here's what he told me. has the nuclear situation made you rethink staying in japan? >> well, it depends on how the wind blows, actually. >> reporter: literally? >> literally. if the wind blows this way, t
from of japan's nuclear reactors. u.s. officials cannot expect the japanese to quickly regained control of the plan's fuel rods. dangerous levels of radiation. good evening, everybody. all lan security is saying that radiation levels from flights from japan, landing and chicago, n.y.. to have real activity, but not enough to be concerned about. - radioactivity. first, what steps are being taken? nuclear helicopters tons of water the pilots cannot get very close. only one of the drop hit the target. not much of an impact. later, soldiers used high-pressure fire trucks. and used that on number three for 30 minutes. 140 mi. away and tokyo the japanese are trying to flee their country. rolling blackouts, food and fuel supplies are low. the united states as it advised americans still stay 50 mi. away from the nuclear areas. the evacue evacuation process of americans out of japan. president obama is telling people not to worry about nuclear plum in our country. >> i want to be very clear that we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the not states. or if it is the west coast, haw
are suffering and also the damage itself. >> one man is grateful for the outpouring of assistance from the u.s. and other countries. one has been communicating through e-mail and she has been looking through japanese web sites to get the latest information. >> you have heard how important skype has been for people to stay in touch with each other. we go to tokyo. what did you experience when the earthquake hit? >> the building was shaking hard and people could not stand up straight. >> did you stay inside or did you go outside? >> i went outside. >> about how long did it last? >> it was for three minutes. >> was there very much damage in tokyo? that was not as close to the northeastern part. >> not too much damage in tokyo? >> i don't think so. >> the hour earthquake and tsunami coverage continues online at wbaltv.com. pictures and videos show the devastation. you can see the pictures and a guide. we have posted the link on our home page. >> maybe next year, that is what many advocates of the same sex marriage legislation are saying after the legislation died. it was sent back to committee. da
nuclear plant. >> today a team of experts from the u.s. are expected to be on hand to help monitor the damaged reactors. you can also bet they'll have one of these, a geiger counter. the bbc's david shukman explains what they can expect when they get there. >> reporter: day after day, new threats emerge at fukushima, multiple explosions, sudden rises in radiation, a scene so hazardous only 50 workers are left on site to try to bring things under control. getting hard information about the fate of the power station is proving really difficult. here's what we think is happening. reactor one, its outer building exploded on saturday. there's probably been a partial melting inside. and they're still pumping in seawater. reactor two, the most worrying, with an explosion here last night and crucially a potential breach inside it. the first possible damage to any of the reactors. it's thought that this device down below, which handles excess pressure, may have been breached. and this could be one source of leaking radiation. now, reactor three is also in trouble with an explosion of the ou
at several u.s. military bases on japanese soil. one more image i want to get to you. here is the earthquake striking again. pictures inside a japanese newsroom. i mean, imagine. total panic there. the biggest damage, begiagain, caused by the massive tsunami. at last count, the official, i want to emphasize official, the official death toll was 151. authorities in japan say it could climb to over 1,000. john? >>> brooke, cnn's kyong lah is based in tokyo, she was on the subway when the earthquake hit. she filed a report now. she made her way to the most devastated part of the country. >> reporter: i'm in the back of our news van. we're trying to get to the northern area, the area that's been hard hit by the tsunami. but what we're finding is that it's very difficult to get up there because of the problems with tokyo still down, paralyzed with the problems we've seen from this afternoon's earthquake. more than 12 hours after the earthquake, you can see we're beginning to move a little bit, but there is still massive gridlock in the city. the highway shut down. the roadways, they're all backed
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